SPACE SWAG

barka-art:

Il be exhibiting my Australian Aborigines series ‘blonde copper ore’ and my series #organized_chaos which was shown last year at MOCADA, at The AACDD 2014 Barge House Festival: Past, Present, Future. Private View 17/9/2014. 5:30-8:30 The group show is on till the 23 Sep, with a Q & A with a few of the artist exhibiting on the Sunday. 

https://www.eventbrite.com/e/aacdd-2014-bargehouse-festival-past-present-future-private-view-tickets-13070573437

#cementbags #tombraider #organized_chaos #barka #bargehouse #southbank #groupshow View Larger

barka-art:

Il be exhibiting my Australian Aborigines series ‘blonde copper ore’ and my series #organized_chaos which was shown last year at MOCADA, at The AACDD 2014 Barge House Festival: Past, Present, Future. Private View 17/9/2014. 5:30-8:30 The group show is on till the 23 Sep, with a Q & A with a few of the artist exhibiting on the Sunday.

https://www.eventbrite.com/e/aacdd-2014-bargehouse-festival-past-present-future-private-view-tickets-13070573437

#cementbags #tombraider #organized_chaos #barka #bargehouse #southbank #groupshow


anotherafrica:

Wangechi Mutu Takes On Transmutation As a New Form of Existentialism
On the eve of Wangechi Mutu’s solo show, ‘Nguva na Nyoka’ (Sirens and Serpents) opening this October 14 2014 at London’s Victoria Miro gallery, the artist shared candid thoughts and insights on her latest body of work with Another Africa’s Joyce Bidouzo-Coudray much like what inspired her to delve into Kenya’s rich folkloric mythologies:
"The fact that women have this option to turn into these myths, these powerful, indefinable creatures – especially in a place like the coast of Kenya where the traditionally patriarchal cultures of the African Mijikenda tribes prevail – is such a testament to all the possibilities of what a woman can do in a place where she is not actually permitted to do much. That is completely inspiring to me also as an artist. So that is why I dug into it." 
Wangechi Mutu
Source | anotherafrica.net

[© Wangechi Mutu. Even, 2014. ]
Image courtesy of Wangechi Mutu and Victoria Miro, London.
 
 ANOTHERAFRICA.NET |  TUMBLR |  FACEBOOK  |  TWITTER  |  INSTAGRAM
View Larger

anotherafrica:

Wangechi Mutu Takes On Transmutation As a New Form of Existentialism

On the eve of Wangechi Mutu’s solo show, ‘Nguva na Nyoka’ (Sirens and Serpents) opening this October 14 2014 at London’s Victoria Miro gallery, the artist shared candid thoughts and insights on her latest body of work with Another Africa’s Joyce Bidouzo-Coudray much like what inspired her to delve into Kenya’s rich folkloric mythologies:

"The fact that women have this option to turn into these myths, these powerful, indefinable creatures – especially in a place like the coast of Kenya where the traditionally patriarchal cultures of the African Mijikenda tribes prevail – is such a testament to all the possibilities of what a woman can do in a place where she is not actually permitted to do much. That is completely inspiring to me also as an artist. So that is why I dug into it."

Wangechi Mutu

Source | anotherafrica.net

[© Wangechi Mutu. Even, 2014. ]

Image courtesy of Wangechi Mutu and Victoria Miro, London.

 

ANOTHERAFRICA.NET | TUMBLR | FACEBOOK | TWITTER | INSTAGRAM


aadatart:

EXHIBITION: New Work by Lakin Ogunbanwo, Oct 8 - Nov 15, 2014

WHATIFTHEWORLD introduces its first exhibition with Lakin Ogunbanwo. Working at the confluence of fashion photography and classical portraiture, young Nigerian photographer Lakin Ogunbanwo creates enigmatic portraits with an erotic and subversive undertone. His subjects exist defiantly in the frame often masked by shadow, drapery and foliage. His use of vibrant flat colour and bold compositions form a more minimalist homage to the african studio photography popular in the 1960s and 70’s.

Pop. Fashion. Vogue. Ogunbanwo’s camera looks with the gaze of one curious of the language of desire. His images celebrate the sculptural nature of the body. The texture of a scar, hair or clothing are agents to draw our awareness to the body as a form, sculpted by light and muscle and clothing. The lustre of skin is enhanced through oiling and juxtaposes the naked with the clothed. Ogunbanwo’s figures are sculpted by light and framed as objects by the camera reminiscent of Robert Mapplethorp or Man Ray. Rather than colour, it is light that defines Ogunbanwo’s images. 

-African & Afro-Diasporan Art Talks

Join us: Twitter | Instagram | Facebook | Google+ | ART SHOP 


quantumfuturism:

ras-al-ghul-is-dead:

A silent protest in Love Park, downtown Philadelphia orchestrated by performance artists protesting the murder of Michael Brown in Ferguson. The onslaught of passerby’s  wanting to take photos with the statue exemplifies the disconnect in American society.  Simply frame out the dead body, and it doesn’t exist.  

Here are some observations by one of the artists involved in the event:

I don’t know who any of these folks are.

They were tourists I presume.

But I heard most of what everything they said. A few lines in particular stood out. There’s one guy not featured in the photos. His friends were trying to get him to join the picture but he couldn’t take his eyes off the body.

"Something about this doesn’t feel right. I’m going to sit this one out, guys." "Com’on man… he’s already dead."

(Laughs.)

There were a billion little quips I heard today. Some broke my heart. Some restored my faith in humanity. There was an older white couple who wanted to take a picture under the statue.

The older gentleman: “Why do they have to always have to shove their politics down our throats.” Older woman: “They’re black kids, honey. They don’t have anything better to do.”

One woman even stepped over the body to get her picture. But as luck would have it the wind blew the caution tape and it got tangle around her foot. She had to stop and take the tape off. She still took her photo.

There was a guy who yelled at us… “We need more dead like them. Yay for the white man!”

"One young guy just cried and then gave me a hug and said ‘thank you. It’s nice to know SOMEBODY sees me.’